Tag Archives: found on the web

June 26, Partial Lunar Eclipse

This weekend’s full moon will be accompanied by a partial lunar eclipse, as the earth’s shadow will briefly dim a portion of the moon’s face.

Will you be able to see it? Yes, in about half of the world, including North America:

Partial Lunar Eclipse of 2010 Jun 26

And in North America, by timezone (table courtesy of Partial Lunar Eclipse Coming On June 26 by Joe Rao):

EDT

CDT

MDT

PDT

First bit of shading

5:50 a.m.

4:50 a.m.

3:50 a.m.

2:50 a.m.

Moon enters umbra

6:17 a.m.

5:17 a.m.

4:17 a.m.

3:17 a.m.

Maximum eclipse

Below the horizon

6:40 a.m.

5:40 a.m.

4:40 a.m.

Moon leaves umbra

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

6:00 a.m.

Last bit of shading

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

6:25 a.m.

From the “Classroom Resources” pages of Starry Night Education, a helpful chart:

Lunar Eclipse - www.starrynighteducation.com

Great links and articles:

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When it doubt leave it out

Helpful list from Scott Bourne, a leading photography blogger and educator, with the delightful reminder… when in doubt, leave it out. (Note, post edited in response to Mr. Bourne’s concern that I had quoted too much. No offense intended, I’m happy to use a non-infringing excerpt. It was truly the last item in the list that attracted my attention.)

1. Use negative space.
2. Avoid merges.
.
.
.
15. When it doubt leave it out.

For the full list and much more, see the author’s website: Composition – Basic Tools – 15 Quick Tips « Photofocus.

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The queue to see the end of the crisis

Cola para ver el final de la crisis
by el silencio / Jaime Lluch
http://www.flickr.com/people/elsilencio/

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Public Opinion

xkcd.com Public Opinion.

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The Sum of All Knowledge

Abstruse Goose

via The Sum of All Knowledge.

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For the stylish zombie hunter

Put This On • because every stylish guy needs an….

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So Pushes to the Head of the Line, Anand Giridharadas

Anand Giridharadas in his New York Times column “Currents” explores the seemingly pervasive and growing use of the word “so” to start sentences.

Have you heard it too? Are you using “so” that way? I am, though I’m a little surprised at myself for having adopted so a-grammatical a mannerism.

So, when Boing Boing brought this to my attention, I thought – interesting, how long has this use of “so” been around, what’s “so” mean in this context, and where did it come from?

Turns out that Anand Giridharadas is a fairly awesome author who answered these questions and more in a light handed and informative but not overly didactic way. Look for yourself but here’re a couple of examples that I could identify with:

“So” … echoes the influence of a science- and data-driven culture. It would have been unimaginable a few decades ago that literature scholars would use neurological correlation analysis to evaluate texts, or that ordinary people would quantify daily activities like eating, sex and sleeping, or that software would calculate what songs we will like.

But in algorithmic times, “so” conveys an algorithmic certitude. It suggests that there is a right answer, which the evidence dictates and which should not be contradicted. Among its synonyms, indeed, are “consequently,” “thus” and “therefore.”

Another use of “so” may have arisen from our fast paced and frequently fragmented lives, to imply a continuation or connection with an interrupted or incomplete previous conversation.

The rise of “so … is another symptom that our communication and conversational lives are chopped up and discontinuous in actual fact, but that we try in several ways to sew them together — or ‘so’ them together, as it were — in order to create a continuous experience.”

So anyway, it was a great column and highly recommended. Links:

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A wave of oil spotted approaching…

The Daily What: This Is The Worst of the Day: A wave of oil spotted approaching….

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Not quite, Tetris

via God dammit, Bob..

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DWFTTW | Down Wind Faster Than The Wind

Is it possible to go downwind faster than the wind, in a wind-powered car (or vehicle)?

Maybe we have a definitive answer as reported on PhysOrg.com:

(PhysOrg.com) — A wind-powered car has been clocked in the US traveling down wind faster than the wind. In a recent run at New Jerusalem in Tracy, California, the car reached a top speed of more than 2.85 times faster than the wind blowing at the time (13.5 mph) powered by the wind itself. The run should now settle the DWFTTW (down wind faster than the wind) debate that has been raging for some time on the Internet about whether or not such a feat was possible.

At the start, before the car is moving, the wind is coming from behind the car (as you’d expect). The wind vane / weather vane I’ve circled in the picture is attached to a mast or pole on the front of the car. It points towards the wind… obvious, but look at the next picture.

Before the car is moving, the wind is coming from behind the car (as you'd expect).

This image, of the car making a “high speed” run is pretty telling… check out the wind direction as indicated by a wind vane (weather vane) and orange ribbon atop a mast attached to the car (yellow circle). Again, the wind vane is pointing towards the wind. At first the wind vane pointed toward the back of the car. In this picture the vane is pointing forward… meaning that the car is going fast enough that the wind is apparently coming from the front of the car. The car is going faster than the wind blowing at it from behind.

Notice the wind direction as indicated by a wind vane (weather vane) and orange ribbon atop a mast attached to the car (yellow circle).

For more pictures and the story of how this vehicle was built and tested see Ride Like the Wind (only faster) at fasterthanthewind.org.

(Thanks to “Google-Backed Wind-Powered Car Goes Faster Than the Wind”, via Slashdot: Google-Backed Wind-Powered Car Goes Faster Than the Wind.)

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Wag More, Bark Less

Boing Boing, A sound rule.

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WTD 976

What the Duck WTD 976.

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