Tom the Dancing Bug: The Futuristic World of 2010


Boing Boing

via Tom the Dancing Bug: The Futuristic World of 2010.

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why doesn’t he / why doesn’t she

why doesn’t he / why doesn’t she

women divorce / men divorce

are democrats / are republicans

via

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Global Temperature Anomalies, May 2010

Excerpts from the NASA Earth Observatory web page:

In May 2010, temperature records assembled by the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) showed wide expanses of slightly above- and slightly below-normal temperatures over most of the globe, but also dramatic warmth near the North Pole. […]

This color-coded map shows global surface temperature anomalies for May 2010 compared to average temperatures for the same time of year from 1951 to 1980. Above-normal temperatures appear in shades of red, and below-normal temperatures appear in shades of blue. Gray areas indicate areas of insufficient data.

[…]

“Where a lot of the big economies are—the United States, Western Europe, Japan—it’s been cool, but the world as a whole is quite warm,” Scambos observes. “The Sahel, the Indus Valley, and China didn’t see a cool spring the way other areas did.”

Global Temperature Anomalies, May 2010 : Image of the Day.

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Some cavemen probably objected to fire.

boxbrown: Bellen! Y’think.

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Tom the Dancing Bug: Nate in “Risky Management”

Boing Boing, Tom the Dancing Bug: Nate in “Risky Management”.

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June 26, Partial Lunar Eclipse

This weekend’s full moon will be accompanied by a partial lunar eclipse, as the earth’s shadow will briefly dim a portion of the moon’s face.

Will you be able to see it? Yes, in about half of the world, including North America:

Partial Lunar Eclipse of 2010 Jun 26

And in North America, by timezone (table courtesy of Partial Lunar Eclipse Coming On June 26 by Joe Rao):

EDT

CDT

MDT

PDT

First bit of shading

5:50 a.m.

4:50 a.m.

3:50 a.m.

2:50 a.m.

Moon enters umbra

6:17 a.m.

5:17 a.m.

4:17 a.m.

3:17 a.m.

Maximum eclipse

Below the horizon

6:40 a.m.

5:40 a.m.

4:40 a.m.

Moon leaves umbra

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

6:00 a.m.

Last bit of shading

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

Below the horizon

6:25 a.m.

From the “Classroom Resources” pages of Starry Night Education, a helpful chart:

Lunar Eclipse - www.starrynighteducation.com

Great links and articles:

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When it doubt leave it out

Helpful list from Scott Bourne, a leading photography blogger and educator, with the delightful reminder… when in doubt, leave it out. (Note, post edited in response to Mr. Bourne’s concern that I had quoted too much. No offense intended, I’m happy to use a non-infringing excerpt. It was truly the last item in the list that attracted my attention.)

1. Use negative space.
2. Avoid merges.
.
.
.
15. When it doubt leave it out.

For the full list and much more, see the author’s website: Composition – Basic Tools – 15 Quick Tips « Photofocus.

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The queue to see the end of the crisis

Cola para ver el final de la crisis
by el silencio / Jaime Lluch
http://www.flickr.com/people/elsilencio/

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Public Opinion

xkcd.com Public Opinion.

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The Sum of All Knowledge

Abstruse Goose

via The Sum of All Knowledge.

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For the stylish zombie hunter

Put This On • because every stylish guy needs an….

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So Pushes to the Head of the Line, Anand Giridharadas

Anand Giridharadas in his New York Times column “Currents” explores the seemingly pervasive and growing use of the word “so” to start sentences.

Have you heard it too? Are you using “so” that way? I am, though I’m a little surprised at myself for having adopted so a-grammatical a mannerism.

So, when Boing Boing brought this to my attention, I thought – interesting, how long has this use of “so” been around, what’s “so” mean in this context, and where did it come from?

Turns out that Anand Giridharadas is a fairly awesome author who answered these questions and more in a light handed and informative but not overly didactic way. Look for yourself but here’re a couple of examples that I could identify with:

“So” … echoes the influence of a science- and data-driven culture. It would have been unimaginable a few decades ago that literature scholars would use neurological correlation analysis to evaluate texts, or that ordinary people would quantify daily activities like eating, sex and sleeping, or that software would calculate what songs we will like.

But in algorithmic times, “so” conveys an algorithmic certitude. It suggests that there is a right answer, which the evidence dictates and which should not be contradicted. Among its synonyms, indeed, are “consequently,” “thus” and “therefore.”

Another use of “so” may have arisen from our fast paced and frequently fragmented lives, to imply a continuation or connection with an interrupted or incomplete previous conversation.

The rise of “so … is another symptom that our communication and conversational lives are chopped up and discontinuous in actual fact, but that we try in several ways to sew them together — or ‘so’ them together, as it were — in order to create a continuous experience.”

So anyway, it was a great column and highly recommended. Links:

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