Curiosity Spotted on Parachute by Orbiter

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From NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory:

NASA’s Curiosity rover and its parachute were spotted by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as Curiosity descended to the surface on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured this image of Curiosity while the orbiter was listening to transmissions from the rover. Curiosity and its parachute are in the center of the white box; the inset image is a cutout of the rover stretched to avoid saturation. The rover is descending toward the etched plains just north of the sand dunes that fringe “Mt. Sharp.” From the perspective of the orbiter, the parachute and Curiosity are flying at an angle relative to the surface, so the landing site does not appear directly below the rover.

The parachute appears fully inflated and performing perfectly. Details in the parachute, such as the band gap at the edges and the central hole, are clearly seen. The cords connecting the parachute to the back shell cannot be seen, although they were seen in the image of NASA’s Phoenix lander descending, perhaps due to the difference in lighting angles. The bright spot on the back shell containing Curiosity might be a specular reflection off of a shiny area. Curiosity was released from the back shell sometime after this image was acquired.

This view is one product from an observation made by HiRISE targeted to the expected location of Curiosity about one minute prior to landing. It was captured in HiRISE CCD RED1, near the eastern edge of the swath width (there is a RED0 at the very edge). This means that the rover was a bit further east or downrange than predicted.

The image scale is 13.2 inches (33.6 centimeters) per pixel.

HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates the orbiter’s HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona, Original Image

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Need to Know

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The Hokey Pokey Shakespeare style!

O proud left foot, that ventures quick within
Then soon upon a backward journey lithe.
Anon, once more the gesture, then begin:
Command sinistral pedestal to writhe.
Commence thou then the fervid Hokey-Poke,
A mad gyration, hips in wanton swirl.
To spin! A wilde release from Heavens yoke.
Blessed dervish! Surely canst go, girl.
The Hoke, the poke — banish now thy doubt
Verily, I say, ’tis what it’s all about.
— by “William Shakespeare”

By Jeff Brechlin

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How It Feels

Some truth, thanks to Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal!

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White Babies Outnumbered

From Matt Bors, White Babies Outnumbered.

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Best of the visualisation web… February 2012 part 1

Visualising Data

via Best of the visualisation web… February 2012 part 1.

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Geologic Time Visualized

Credit: G-100, Introductory Geology, Chuck DeMets and Clark Johnson, University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.geology.wisc.edu/homepages/g100s2/public_html/history_of_life.htm

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Paul Newman on the set of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Paul Newman on the set of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969, dir. George Roy Hill ) (photo by Jimmy Mitchell, via 20th Century Fox: Inside the Photo Archive)

via Paul Newman on the set of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Old Hollywood.

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Portrait of Shuttle and International Space Station

Shuttle Endeavour and International Space Station

On May 23 European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli captured this image of the shuttle Endeavour docked to the International Space Station from more than 600 feet away.

This was among the first pictures ever taken of a shuttle docked to the station from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

It was taken on the last voyage of a shuttle, the Endeavor.

38 of the images can viewed and downloaded from http://go.nasa.gov/stationportrait (or http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/multimedia/e27depart.html)

Video of the departing Soyuz spacecraft:
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?collection_id=14555

Image as highlighted on the Picture of the Day Gallery
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1969.html

Thanks to: A Different Beauty For Space from The Technium on kk.org: http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/06/a_different_bea.php

Shuttle Endeavour and International Space Station

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For Geoff, before his Stats Final

Happy Now?

Happy Now?

Thanks to icanhascheezburger.com.

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Garry Winograd, Jerome Liebling, Man Ray, Paul Strand

Some inspirations I’ve found in Yale University’s newly released “Open Access” collective catalog.

Search the collection here: http://discover.odai.yale.edu/ydc/

Browse from here using an nice, simple interface.

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The Creationist’s Mistake

“I’m not a believer, but I’m friendly to religion, partly because it goes with being human—it’s an odd kind of humanism which is hostile to something which is so quintessentially human as religion.” That said, “I’m very opposed to investing science with the needs and requirements of religion. I’m equally opposed to the tendency within religion, which exists in things like creationism and intelligent design, to turn religion into a kind of pseudo-science. If you go back to St. Augustine or before, to the Jewish scholars who talk about these issues, they never regard the Genesis story as a theory. Augustine says explicitly that it should not be interpreted explicitly, that it’s a way of accessing truths which can’t really be formulated by the human mind in any rational way. It’s a way of accessing mysterious features which will remain mysterious. So it was always seen right up to the rise of modern science—as a myth, not a theory. What these creationists are doing is retreating, they’re accepting the view of religion promoted by scientific enemies of religion, and saying, no, we have got science and it’s better than your science. Complete error.”

A review of John Gray’s book The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death from the Daily Beast, Book Beast column,Human Quest For Immortality: John Gray on New Book, The Immortalization Commission.

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